Email updates

Keep up to date with the latest news and content from JISSN and BioMed Central.

Journal App

google play app store
Open Access Highly Accessed Research article

Does long-term creatine supplementation impair kidney function in resistance-trained individuals consuming a high-protein diet?

Rebeca Lugaresi1, Marco Leme1, Vítor de Salles Painelli1, Igor Hisashi Murai1, Hamilton Roschel124, Marcelo Tatit Sapienza3, Antonio Herbert Lancha Junior1 and Bruno Gualano12*

Author Affiliations

1 School of Physical Education and Sport - Laboratory of Applied Nutrition and Metabolism, University of Sao Paulo, Av Mello de Moraes, 65, Sao Paulo, SP 05508-030, Brazil

2 School of Medicine – Division of Rheumatology, University of Sao Paulo, Av Mello de Moraes, 65, Sao Paulo, SP 05508-030, Brazil

3 School of Medicine – Division of Nuclear Medicine, University of Sao Paulo, Av Mello de Moraes, 65, Sao Paulo, SP 05508-030, Brazil

4 School of Physical Education and Sport - Laboratory of Neuromuscular Adaptations to Strength Training, University of Sao Paulo, Av Mello de Moraes, 65, Sao Paulo, SP 05508-030, Brazil

For all author emails, please log on.

Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition 2013, 10:26  doi:10.1186/1550-2783-10-26

Published: 16 May 2013

Abstract

Background

The aim of this study was to determine the effects of creatine supplementation on kidney function in resistance-trained individuals ingesting a high-protein diet.

Methods

A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial was performed. The participants were randomly allocated to receive either creatine (20 g/d for 5 d followed by 5 g/d throughout the trial) or placebo for 12 weeks. All of the participants were engaged in resistance training and consumed a high-protein diet (i.e., ≥ 1.2 g/Kg/d). Subjects were assessed at baseline (Pre) and after 12 weeks (Post). Glomerular filtration rate was measured by 51Cr-EDTA clearance. Additionally, blood samples and a 24-h urine collection were obtained for other kidney function assessments.

Results

No significant differences were observed for 51Cr-EDTA clearance throughout the trial (Creatine: Pre 101.42 ± 13.11, Post 108.78 ± 14.41 mL/min/1.73m2; Placebo: Pre 103.29 ± 17.64, Post 106.68 ± 16.05 mL/min/1.73m2; group x time interaction: F = 0.21, p = 0.64). Creatinine clearance, serum and urinary urea, electrolytes, proteinuria, and albuminuria remained virtually unchanged.

Conclusions

A 12-week creatine supplementation protocol did not affect kidney function in resistance-trained healthy individuals consuming a high-protein diet; thus reinforcing the safety of this dietary supplement.

Trial registration

ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01817673

Keywords:
Glomerular filtration rate; 51Cr-EDTA clearance; Side effects