Open Access Highly Accessed Research article

Does long-term creatine supplementation impair kidney function in resistance-trained individuals consuming a high-protein diet?

Rebeca Lugaresi1, Marco Leme1, Vítor de Salles Painelli1, Igor Hisashi Murai1, Hamilton Roschel124, Marcelo Tatit Sapienza3, Antonio Herbert Lancha Junior1 and Bruno Gualano12*

Author Affiliations

1 School of Physical Education and Sport - Laboratory of Applied Nutrition and Metabolism, University of Sao Paulo, Av Mello de Moraes, 65, Sao Paulo, SP 05508-030, Brazil

2 School of Medicine – Division of Rheumatology, University of Sao Paulo, Av Mello de Moraes, 65, Sao Paulo, SP 05508-030, Brazil

3 School of Medicine – Division of Nuclear Medicine, University of Sao Paulo, Av Mello de Moraes, 65, Sao Paulo, SP 05508-030, Brazil

4 School of Physical Education and Sport - Laboratory of Neuromuscular Adaptations to Strength Training, University of Sao Paulo, Av Mello de Moraes, 65, Sao Paulo, SP 05508-030, Brazil

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Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition 2013, 10:26  doi:10.1186/1550-2783-10-26

Published: 16 May 2013

Abstract

Background

The aim of this study was to determine the effects of creatine supplementation on kidney function in resistance-trained individuals ingesting a high-protein diet.

Methods

A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial was performed. The participants were randomly allocated to receive either creatine (20 g/d for 5 d followed by 5 g/d throughout the trial) or placebo for 12 weeks. All of the participants were engaged in resistance training and consumed a high-protein diet (i.e., ≥ 1.2 g/Kg/d). Subjects were assessed at baseline (Pre) and after 12 weeks (Post). Glomerular filtration rate was measured by 51Cr-EDTA clearance. Additionally, blood samples and a 24-h urine collection were obtained for other kidney function assessments.

Results

No significant differences were observed for 51Cr-EDTA clearance throughout the trial (Creatine: Pre 101.42 ± 13.11, Post 108.78 ± 14.41 mL/min/1.73m2; Placebo: Pre 103.29 ± 17.64, Post 106.68 ± 16.05 mL/min/1.73m2; group x time interaction: F = 0.21, p = 0.64). Creatinine clearance, serum and urinary urea, electrolytes, proteinuria, and albuminuria remained virtually unchanged.

Conclusions

A 12-week creatine supplementation protocol did not affect kidney function in resistance-trained healthy individuals consuming a high-protein diet; thus reinforcing the safety of this dietary supplement.

Trial registration

ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01817673

Keywords:
Glomerular filtration rate; 51Cr-EDTA clearance; Side effects